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Summer Reading  

Last Updated: Jun 27, 2017 URL: http://libguides.slrsd.org/summerreading Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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Overview

For students enrolled in Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition (Grade 12)

Summer reading books:

  1. Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

  2. Black Water by Joyce Carol Oates

  3. The Best American Short Stories 2015 edited by T. C. Boyle

 

This summer you have three books to read. Not only will you have a summer assignment with each text, but you will be tested on all three when we return to school, and you will use them again for term two on the Postmodern Literature Research Paper. All summer work must be handwritten.

 

 

      
     

    Assignment PDF

    Dear AP Lit seniors,

     

    I welcome anyone into AP Literature who is willing to put in the time and effort. Please remember you cannot graduate if you do not pass this class. This is an AP class, which means it is meant to be taught like a college course. I expect that you act like a responsible and respectful adult when you enter my classroom, therefore no late work will receive credit. If you need help with work you must make it a priority to arrange a time to stay after school. The majority of your term grades will be based on 40-minute timed writes. You will have four to ten grades per term and that is all. I am willing to help anyone who advocates for himself or herself and  anyone who cares about learning (rather than the grade).

     

    P.S. I don’t feel like I should have to say this, but unfortunately every year I catch a few students who have plagiarized, whether from an online source or a friend. Please do not do this; you will not like the consequences.

     

    Required reading. All summer work is due on the first day of school whether you are here or not. No exceptions. No late work accepted.

     

    This summer you have three books to read. Not only will you have a summer assignment with each text, but you will be tested on all three when we return to school, and you will use them again for term two on the Postmodern Literature Research Paper. All summer work must be handwritten.

     

    1. Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

    2. Black Water by Joyce Carol Oates

    3. The Best American Short Stories 2015 edited by T. C. Boyle

     

    Song of Solomon:

    Part A: Pick one major character and one minor character to define. You must pick three adjectives to describe them, five quotes from the text that are properly cited, and then write a paragraph explanation on who they are overall.

    Major Characters

    Minor Characters

    1. Macon II

    2. Milkman (Macon III)

    3. Pilate

    1. Guitar 4.  First Corinthians

    2. Hagar 5.  Magdalene

    3. Ruth 6.  Circe

    Part B: Pick one motif and one symbol from the lists to trace throughout the novel. For Song of Solomon pick eight to twelve quotes for each (properly cited). For motif, follow these quotes  with  a paragraph of analysis on what lesson Morrison intends for you, the audience, to take away from your reading of the novel. For symbol,  follow the quotes  with a paragraph of analysis on what the symbol means.

    Recommendation: For all texts it might be easier to follow two or three motifs and symbols and choose the one you like most to write up at the end of reading.

     

    Motif: An idea that recurs. The idea will come up over and over again throughout the text.

    Symbol: Commonly an object, action, or color. It usually represents more than one thing or changes meaning over the course of the story.

    • Abandonment/Isolation

    • Race

    • Gender Roles

    • Religion/Higher Powers/The Supernatural

    • Death

    • Identity

    • Truth

    • The Past/Memories

    • Gluttony

    • Relationships (of any kind)

    • War/fighting

    • Traveling/Journeys

    • Suffering/Punishment

    • Sex/Sexuality

    • Direction (as in purpose, or as in compass)

    • Perspectives

    • Leaping/Jumping/Flying

    • Flowers

    • Houses

    • Eyes/Cat Eyes

    • Cats/Animals

    • Blue

    • Yellow

    • Nature (as in the outdoors)

    • Money/Gold

    • Water (in any form)

    • Fire

    • Song

    • Dreams

    • Makeup

    • Anything else you find for the short stories if you ask first.

     

    Black Water:

    Part A: This novella does not move in chronological order, but instead jumps around through the life of Kelly Kelleher. You will create a timeline of sorts and list events under different chunks of time in Kelly’s life. The categories are:

    • Childhood

    • Middle School/High School

    • College

    • Adult life (post college)

    • July 3rd

    • July 4th (You can break this category into two--at the house versus in the car--if you want)

    Part B:  Pick one motif and one symbol from the lists  to trace throughout the novel. For this novel you will  pick five to ten quotes for motif and five to ten quotes for symbol (properly cited). For motif, follow these quotes up with  a paragraph of analysis on what lesson Oates intends for you, the audience, to take away from the story.  For symbol,  follow the quotes  with a paragraph of analysis on what the symbol means.

     

    The Best American Short Stories 2015:

    There are twenty stories in the text, listed below are the stories you will read with the corresponding assignment.

    1. “The Siege at Whale Cay” by Megan Mayhew Bergman

    2. “You’ll Apologize If You Have To” by Ben Fowlkes

    3. “Sh’khol” by Colum McCann

    4. “Thunderstruck” by Elizabeth McCracken

    5. “Kavitha and Mustafa” by  Shobha Rao

    6. “About My Aunt” by Joan Silber

    7. “North” by Aria Beth Sloss

    8. “ Mr. Voice” by Jess Walter

    Part A: Summarize each story in a paragraph (no more than ten sentences!)

    Part B: Pick one motif and one symbol from the lists to trace throughout the novel. For each of the eight stories  pick three to five  quotes (properly cited). For motif, follow this up for each story  with  a paragraph of analysis on what lesson the author intends for you, the audience, to take away from the story. For symbol,  follow this up with a paragraph of analysis on what the symbol means.

     

    You will write your first 40-minute timed write essay in class on Song of Solomon. We WILL NOT discuss this text together until after you write the essay. However, we will do some practice 40-minute essays with the other two summer reading books so that you have a general sense of how to tackle the question.

     

    In class we will have a graded Socratic Seminar on Black Water and The Best American Short Stories 2015.






    ALL quotes used from the SUMMER TEXTS must properly cite page numbers.

    Example: “The sight of Mr Smith and his wide blue wings transfixed them for a few seconds, as did the woman's singing and the roses strewn about” (6).

    YOU WILL LOSE ONE POINT FOR EVERY QUOTE NOT PROPERLY CITED.

    See this website for citation help:https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/03/

     

    ALL WORK MUST BE HANDWRITTEN






    Please do not hesitate to email me over the summer if you have any questions at aferrara@slrsd.org :)

     

       

      AP English Literature and Comp (Grade 12)

      Cover Art
      Song of Solomon - Toni Morrison
      ISBN: 9780613014816
      Publication Date: 1987-01-01
      A black man's search for his family's history unveils four generations of African-American experience.

      Cover Art
      Black Water - Joyce Carol Oates
      Call Number: On Order
      ISBN: 0452269865
      Publication Date: 1993-05-01
      Joyce Carol Oates has taken a shocking story that has become an American myth and, from it, has created a novel of electrifying power and illumination.

      Cover Art
      The Best American Short Stories 2015 - Heidi Pitlor (Editor); T. C. Boyle (Editor)
      ISBN: 9780547939414
      Publication Date: 2015-10-06
      In his introduction to this one hundredth volume of the beloved Best American Short Stories, guest editor T. C. Boyle writes, "The Model T gave way to the Model A and to the Ferrari and the Prius . . . modernism to postmodernism and post-postmodernism. We advance. We progress. We move on. But we are part of a tradition." Boyle's choices of stories reflect a vibrant range of characters, from a numb wife who feels alive only in the presence of violence to a new widower coming to terms with his sudden freedom, from a missing child to a champion speedboat racer. These stories will grab hold and surprise, which according to Boyle is "what the best fiction offers, and there was no shortage of such in this year's selections."

      @SLRHS

      MLA Formatting--Purdue OWL

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